Webinars

SCLC's webinar series is integral to the technical assistance provided by the SCLC. Nationally recognized smoking cessation experts offer the latest information related to smoking cessation (including effective interventions) for the general and the behavioral health populations.

The Goals of SCLC’s Webinar Series:

  • Provide training and technical assistance to raise awareness of the many benefits smoking cessation efforts and to increase understanding of effective smoking cessation strategies.
  • Implement or enhance existing tobacco cessation services using evidence-based practices.
  • Ensure that consumers and staff have access to smoking cessation services and support to promote health and wellness.
  • Establish partnerships between behavioral health and nicotine cessation organizations to increase available tobacco cessation resources in communities. 

SCLC has over 100 webinars covering the latest topics on tobacco addiction and recovery

 

Upcoming Webinars

Tobacco Product Use and COVID-19: An Overview of the Science and Public Health Implications

Speakers

Brian A. King, PhD, MPH

Deputy Director for Research Translation, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Dr. King provides scientific leadership and technical expertise related to multiple aspects of tobacco prevention and control. He joined the CDC and OSH in 2010 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, before which he worked as a Research Affiliate in the Division of Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York. During his time at Roswell Park, his research focus was tobacco prevention and control. Dr. King has worked for 15 years to provide sound scientific evidence to guide tobacco control policy and to communicate this information to decision makers, the media, and the general public. He has authored or coauthored over 175 peer-reviewed scientific articles about tobacco prevention and control, was senior editor of the 2016 and 2020 Surgeon General’s Report, lead author of CDC’s “Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs,” and Senior Official for CDC’s 2019 Emergency Operations Center activation for E-cigarette, or Vaping, Product Use-Associated Lung Injury (EVALI). He holds a PhD and MPH in epidemiology from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

Webinar Objectives

Tobacco product use is the leading cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. The risks of tobacco product use have been compounded by the COVID-19 pandemic, with emerging data showing that current and former cigarette smokers are at increased risk of more severe illness from COVID-19. In this webinar, participants will gain an understanding of the state of the science with regard to COVID-19 outcomes and tobacco product use, including cigarette smoking and e-cigarette use. The speaker will also provide participants with information about evidence-based strategies to prevent and reduce tobacco product use, including resources for healthcare providers and the general public.

At the end of the webinar, you will be able to:

  1. Describe the adverse health effects of tobacco product use in the United States, as well as disparities in use across population groups.
  2. Discuss the state of the science with regard to COVID-19 outcomes and tobacco product use, including cigarette smoking and e-cigarette use.
  3. Explain clinical and public health approaches to prevent and reduce tobacco product use, including during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Unboxing IQOS: History, risk perceptions, and clinical implications

Speakers

Pamela M. Ling, MD, MPH

Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine and Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, University of California, San Francisco

Pam Ling is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine and Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education. Her research is on tobacco, media, and social marketing with an emphasis on young people. She focuses on understanding how tobacco marketing encourages youth and young adults to initiate tobacco use, and counter-engineering these strategies to improve tobacco control programs. She conducts research on marketing of smokeless tobacco products and other new and alternative tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes. The goal of this work is to use market research strategies to improve clinical, policy, and public health interventions. She also directs the Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Training Program and sees patients as a primary care provider.

Minji Kim, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education (CTCRE), University of California, San Francisco

Minji Kim is a postdoctoral fellow at Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education (CTCRE), University of California, San Francisco. Kim's research focuses on targeted and tailored health communication. Kim's recent project include examining targeted marketing and counter-marketing of emerging tobacco products, and how that impacts vulnerable populations. First, she is actively engaging in tobacco control policy by making public comments and publishing on novel tobacco product marketing, such as e-cigarettes and heated tobacco products, including IQOS (Philip Morris International). Second, Kim is working with under-served Asian American community to develop culturally appropriate anti-tobacco intervention. She is also is examining the effects of psychographic targeting strategy, such as using peer groups that share values and social identity, in tobacco marketing and counter-marketing messages for youth and young adults. Kim received a Ph.D. in Communication from the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Prior to her academic life, she worked as an associate consultant at The Boston Consulting Group’s Seoul office.

Webinar Objectives

  1. Compare the features and marketing claims of current and past heated tobacco products, included the "IQOS" product recently introduced in the US
  2. Identify three features of IQOS product, packaging or promotional claims that influence young adult tobacco users' perceptions of IQOS risk and benefits
  3. Synthesize the available data on product features, marketing and health in clinical recommendations for discussing IQOS and other heated tobacco product use in clinical settings